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Chronic Disease Management

A chronic disease constitutes a medical condition that will always be present in a person’s life. Chronic diseases can range from autoimmune disorders, to heart problems, to chronic pain. Chronic diseases are better managed when a person is well-educated on their own chronic disease, so that they may conduct their lives in a way that will not worsen their chronic condition.

All Chronic Disease Management Posts
by our physicians
By Dr. Shantan Reddy
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 100 million adults in the United States are prediabetic or diabetic. Both conditions are the result of higher than normal blood sugar levels, typically 100 mg/dL or higher. If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes or diabetes, you are at an increased risk of developing other health conditions including stroke, heart or kidney disease. When blood sugar levels remain elevated for an extended period of time, it can also affect the health of your eyes and lead to complications such as blurry vision and in some cases, blindness. While diabetes is a serious disease, you can manage your blood sugar with medications and by following a healthy lifestyle. Taking steps to keep your blood sugar levels within the recommended range, along with regular checkups with your primary care physician and an ophthalmologist, can minimize your risk of developing complications. Board-certified ophthalmologist, Shantan Reddy, MD, shares how diabetes can affect your vision and offers tips to maintain your eye health.

By Karl Szafranski, MD
Caregivers sacrifice a lot for those they care for, but many times neglect their own health in the process. To help prevent symptoms of burnout, Dr. Karl Szafranski has compiled tips to recognize caregiver burnout in yourself and others, as well as how to practice self-care in such a demanding role.

By Mohamed Ghumra, MD
On July 12, Governor Pritzker approved the Seizure Smart Act into law after being unanimously passed by the House and Senate, requiring schools to train staff members, teachers and bus drivers on seizure first aid. The program also requires the parent or guardian of a student with epilepsy to submit a seizure action plan to the school, providing the information needed for school staff to properly identify and treat seizures.

By Doreen Ventura, MD
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, also known as NSAIDs, are available over-the-counter and are commonly used to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. While these medications are generally considered safe for most people to use as needed, long-term use should be avoided, especially when taking a high dosage. NSAIDs can be particularly harmful for those with certain health conditions, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD).

By Nikhil Martis, MD
An estimated 25-55 million people in the United States live with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a functional disorder of the colon that causes a variety of unpleasant gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS symptoms can develop with little to no warning, causing feelings of anxiety, frustration and social isolation. Identifying what triggers your IBS and developing ways to manage your symptoms can have a significant impact on your health and quality of life. Our Gastroenterologists share tips to manage your symptoms and regain control of your life.

By Michelle Winter, MD
If you experience pelvic discomfort, pain during intercourse or have moderate to severe cramping during your menstrual cycle, you may have endometriosis, a condition that impacts up to one in ten women.

By Adelina Hung, MD
Your liver supports many essential bodily functions, so it is important to keep your liver functioning properly. There are several things you can do to keep your liver healthy and reduce your risk of developing liver disease, cirrhosis and cancer, including diet and lifestyle modifications.

By DuPage Medical Group Pulmonary Medicine
We understand receiving a COPD diagnosis can be stressful, and while everyone copes differently, the emotions experienced with a diagnosis are often similar among patients. A few of the most common initial and lingering emotions include panic, depression and anxiety. You are not facing your diagnosis alone, and there are several ways to help combat the negative emotions that may accompany COPD. Create an action plan today.

By DuPage Medical Group Cardiology
Knowing your family history and having open, proactive discussions with your physician is crucial to maintaining good health. Hear how a DMG patient survived cardiac arrest and continues to partner with his physicians to keep his heart healthy.

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